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Why Diet Control is Necessary?

Diet plays an important role in the maintenance of a healthy urological system. After nutrients are absorbed from food, waste is carried to the kidneys for excretion as urine. Many kidney problems can be prevented or managed by modifying your present diet. Reduce your intake of salty, processed foods, protein, phosphorus-rich foods, and potassium-rich foods, and instead, increase your intake of fluids, fruits, and vegetables.

Kidney stones may form by the concentration of oxalate, calcium, and phosphorus. In general, foods that increase the alkalinity of urine such as milk, dried fruits, vegetables (such as peas, beans, and greens) and bread are beneficial; whereas, those that increase acidities such as meat, eggs, fish, rice, and cereal should be consumed with moderation. The formation of kidney stones can be controlled by:

  • Restricting dietary sources of oxalate such as beets, spinach, nuts, potato, chocolate, coffee, and tea.
  • Vitamin C, supplemented in a diet, breaks down to form oxalate, so its consumption must be controlled.
  • Calcium binds to oxalate. So calcium-rich foods are recommended to prevent the absorption of oxalate by the body.
  • Reduce your protein intake to 2 to 3 servings per day.
  • Reduce your sodium intake to 2-3 grams per day, and limit processed and canned foods.
  • Fluid intake should be increased so that your urine is dilute enough to prevent stone formation. The color of your urine may be used as an indicator of dilution but generally drinking 10-12 glasses of water a day is recommended.
  • Adding lemon juice to water has also been found to reduce stone formation.

The kidneys are important for your complete health, so to keep them functioning well it is important to follow a healthy diet.

Practice Location

Medical City Hospital-Building C
7777 Forest Lane,
Suite C-670,
Dallas, TX 75230

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